How To Prevent Varicose Veins If You Are A Nurse

An estimated 60% of Americans will face varicose veins at some point. Varicose veins are bluish cords that that commonly form in the legs and feet. If you are a nurse, you have a higher risk since you spend long periods of time on your feet. Here are some tips for nurses to prevent varicose veins in the legs. Wear the Right Shoes Investing in a good pair of nursing shoes is essential to prevent varicose veins. Read More 

Two Tips For Clearing Hair Out Of Your Hearing Aid

If you have a deficiency in hearing, you'll only be able to live a normal life with a fully functioning hearing aid. While most hearing aids are made to last with quality materials and first rate craftsmanship, you'll always need to be concerned with loose head hairs penetrating the machine. To ensure that you completely rid your hearing aid of loose hairs with a minimum amount of effort, pay attention to these two tips. Read More 

Three Exercises That Will Strengthen The Arches Of Your Feet

Strong arches are important for a number of reasons. When your arches are strong, your foot absorbs the impact of walking or running more effectively, reducing your risk of injuries like shin splints and IT band syndrome. Strong arches also allow you to walk or run for longer without fatigue, and they are less likely to develop plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the connective tissue in the bottom of your foot. Read More 

How To Sell Your Stair Lift

When you purchase a new stair lift for a loved one, you will most likely need to sell it at some point. Stair lifts are used an average of three years, but can last as long as ten years. Fortunately, you will be able to sell your stair lift to a third-party and you may also receive cash through the company's own buyback program. Buyback Programs are the Most Convenient Read More 

Medically-Related VA Services Available To Disabled Or Chronically-Ill Veterans Who Remain Living At Home

If you are a veteran in need of home health services because of acute illness, permanent disability, or a long-term health condition, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has several programs available to help you. Provided you served in the active military and were not dishonorably discharged, you may qualify for VA health benefits and services, including home health services. The services you receive depend on your needs. Skilled Care If you need health care services for a limited period of time, and illness confines you to your home, or you don't live near a VA facility and are unable to travel, you may qualify for VA's Skilled Home Health Care Services program. Read More